leftImage
rightImage

Let’s Talk mushrooms…

candh-smThe mushroom industry has been dominated by companies cultivating the Agaricus mushroom variety (button mushrooms, cremini and portobello) thereby limiting our offerings in grocery stores and our options for the dinner table.  In recent years, there has been an increase in the specialty mushroom market partially due to the explosion of the farm to table movement, demand from restaurant chefs and as a result of medical research that continues to demonstrate the positive effects that these culinary gems have on our health.

As a response to the increasing demand for exotic mushrooms, Terrafunga is growing gourmet varieties that include shiitake, maitake, lion’s mane and oyster mushrooms.  Our company also offers wild mushrooms harvested in the mountains of Vermont where the abundance of trees is an ideal environment for many delectable species.  Each season has its own offering from the wonderful morel in the spring to chanterelles and black trumpets in the summer, and boletes, oysters, lobsters and many more in late summer and early fall.

Health Benefits:

Improved immune system:

Mushrooms are packed with essential vitamins and nutrients that enhance immune functions by increasing production of antiviral proteins.  Studies have shown that substituting one or two servings of shiitake mushrooms improves the body’s immune system.  Additionally, reishi have antiviral and antibacterial properties.

Vitamin D:

Mushrooms are high in vitamin D which improves our metabolism and boosts our immune system thereby helping to prevent infections and autoimmune diseases.  It is a known antioxidant and is essential for the absorption of calcium and phosphorous in the body.

Improved nutrition:

Mushrooms have the advantage of being low in fat, salt, cholesterol and calories making them an excellent food source for any healthy diet. They also contain important nutrients such as proteins, enzymes, B vitamins, potassium and magnesium.

Antioxidant:

Mushrooms have a unique antioxidant called ergothioneine that contains sulfur, essential for elasticity in hair, skin and nails.

Copper:

Mushrooms supply us with this important mineral that enhances red blood cell production, facilitates iron absorption and protects the heart’s blood circulation and nervous system.

Weight loss:

Mushrooms contain metabolism-boosting nutrients such as protein, fiber and B vitamins. Studies have shown that substituting mushrooms for red meat helped enhance and maintain weight loss.

Improved memory and mood:

Lion’s mane has at least two nerve growth factors (erinacines) that have been shown to improve cognitive factors such as memory and other neurological disorders.  Additionally, tests have shown that this particular mushroom also improves menopausal symptoms.

Lower cholesterol:

Shiitakes contain a compound known as eritadenine thought to lower cholesterol by blocking the way cholesterol is absorbed in the bloodstream.

Potassium:

In recent studies, mushrooms have been shown to have more potassium than bananas! This element helps prevent strokes, lower blood pressure, alleviate anxiety and stress and enhance muscle strength.

Sources: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, fasab.org, American Cancer Society, cancer.org, Paul Stamets, fungiperfecti.com, organicfacts.net, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, ars.usda.gov, New England Journal of Medicine Aug 2014

Information on this website is for information purposes only.  Consult a medical professional for health related questions, diagnoses and remedies.

mushrooms & more

Protect your pets from poisonous mushrooms

With multiple news outlets reporting that several people have been poisoned by Death Cap mushrooms in recent weeks and the. Continue Reading >

Out of Darkness, Bright New Flavor

Wonderful NYT article from 2002 about Black Trumpets. Great recipes at the end! About Black trumpets courtesy of the New. Continue Reading >

Mushroom ragout over creamy polenta

Some say polenta is the precursor to bread, one of the earliest and simplest forms of food. Ancient grains such. Continue Reading >